La derrota de Quimera Painting, Oil on canvas, Size: 47.2 W x 39.4 H in (120 W x 100 H cm)

Scroll this

La Derrota de Quimera. Buenos Aires, spring 2014. Painting, Oil on canvas, Size: 47.2 W x 39.4 H in (120 W x 100 H cm).  © 2014 Florencia San Martin Brück/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


THE KHIMAIRA (or Chimera) was a monstrous beast which ravaged the countryside of Lykia in Anatolia. It was a composite creature, with the body and maned head of a lion, a goat’s head rising from its back, a set of goat-udders, and a serpentine tail.

The hero Bellerophon was commanded to slay it by King Iobates. He rode into battle against the beast on the back of the winged horse Pegasos and, driving a lead-tipped lance down the Khimaira’s flaming throat, suffocated it.

A Greco-Roman mosaic recently unearthed in Syria indicates that the famous medieval scene of St George and the Dragon was derived from ancient Greco-Roman depictions of Bellerophon spearing the Khimaira from the back of Pegasos.

CHIMAERA (Chimaira), a fire-breathing monster, which, according to the Homeric poems, was of divine origin. She was brought up by Amisodarus, king of Caria, and afterwards made great havoc in all the country around and among men. The fore part of her body was that of a lion, and the hind part that of a dragon, while the middle was that of a goat. According to Hesiod, she was a daughter of Typhaon and Echidna, and had three heads, one of each of the three animals before mentioned, whence she is called trikephalos or trisômatos. She was killed by Bellerophon, and Virgil places her together with other monsters at the entrance of Orcus. The origin of the notion of this fire-breathing monster must probably be sought for in the volcano of the name of Chimaera near Phaselis, in Lycia, or in the volcanic valley near the Cragus, which is described as the scene of the events connected with the Chimaera. In the works of art recently discovered in Lycia, we find several representations of the Chimaera in the simple form of a species of lion still occurring in that country.

Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.